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Cresskill-Closter Daily Voice serves Closter, Cresskill & Demarest

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Metropolitan Farm In Closter Offers Eggs Around The Clock

Metropolitan Farm in Closter is closing out its season but it still offers more than a gross of eggs a day.
Metropolitan Farm in Closter is closing out its season but it still offers more than a gross of eggs a day. Photo Credit: Metropolitan Farm
Metropolitan Farm in Closter offers eggs 24-hours a day, even during the winter when other parts of the farm are closed.
Metropolitan Farm in Closter offers eggs 24-hours a day, even during the winter when other parts of the farm are closed. Photo Credit: Melissa Heule
Metropolitan Farm in Closter offers eggs out of a self-service truck.
Metropolitan Farm in Closter offers eggs out of a self-service truck. Photo Credit: Melissa Heule

CLOSTER, N.J. -- Metropolitan Farm in Closter may be closing most of its operations for January and February, but its egg vehicle will be available 24-hours a day.

The farm continues to profit with a self-serve vehicle that is loadable and can store and dispense farm-fresh eggs throughout the year.

"Just put your six bucks in and people can get their eggs," said farm manager Jennifer Anderson, who was walking a dog around the property as crews organized the remains of Christmas trees, soil and supplies around the property.

“It’s been a very good first season like this especially when other local farms are closing."

The farm has guinea hens and beehives on the property as well as 250 chickens that lay 16 - 20 dozen eggs a day.

Supplies usually run out, and any leftovers occasionally head to Fort Lee.

Most of the eggs can last in room temperature for three weeks with a protective coating, but once they are chilled, they should remain cold.

“The yolks are so much richer — they are much more orange and they’ll ruin all other eggs. I can’t go to the diner anymore,” Anderson said.

Honeybees are also still thriving in warm temperatures, late in the season, Anderson noted, and they were able to collect over 200 pounds of honey during the season.

Once the next few months pass, the farm will start up again with their perennials and garden-variety crops.

“It gets cold by the cash registers," said Anderson, "but it’s not that bad.”

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